Hawaii's Kilauea volcano goes 'ballistic'

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Hawaii's Kilauea volcano goes 'ballistic'

A massive fast moving lava flow consumes everything in its path, as the flames from the remnants of one home burns on the left, while it approaches another on the right. Pahoa, Hawaii, USA, 19 May 2018. The ongoing eruption of Kilauea is the largest in decades, destroying more than 40 homes to date, and displacing thousands. EPA
A resident photographs toxic gases emitting from cracks in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii Saturday, May 19, 2018. Two fissures that opened up in a rural Hawaii community have merged to produce faster and more fluid lava. Scientists say the characteristics of lava oozing from fissures in the ground has changed significantly as new magma mixes with decades-old stored lava. AP
A young resident keeps an eye on lava from a Kilauea volcano fissure erupting and flowing near her home on Hawaii's Big Island on May 19, 2018 in Kapoho, Hawaii. The U.S. Geological Survey said the volcano erupted explosively on May 17 launching a plume about 30,000 feet into the sky. AFP
Lava erupts on the outskirts of Pahoa during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., May 19, 2018. REUTERS
A lava flow is seen on a road in Pahoa, Hawaii, U.S., May 17, 2018 in this picture obtained from social media on May 18, 2018. Kris Burmeister/via Reuters
Wearing a gas mask, U.S. Air National Guardsman Orlando Corpuz uses an SO2 detector to monitor the air quality in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii Friday, May 18, 2018. Hawaii residents covered their faces with masks after a volcano menacing the Big Island for weeks exploded, sending a mixture of pulverized rock, glass and crystal into the air in its strongest eruption of sandlike ash in days. AP
Evacuee Steve Clapper tells his mother, Euteva Bukowiecki, to wear an oxygen tube at a shelter Friday, May 18, 2018, in Pahoa, Hawaii. Hawaii residents covered their faces with masks after a volcano menacing the Big Island for weeks exploded, sending a mixture of pulverized rock, glass and crystal into the air in its strongest eruption of sandlike ash in days. AP
A home is surrounded by massive flows, as lava effuses from a violent fissure eruption on Kilauea's east rift zone, Pahoa, Hawaii, USA, 19 May 2018. The ongoing eruption of Kilauea is the largest in decades, destroying more than 40 homes to date, and displacing thousands. EPA
Center lane lines are partially visible along the lava-covered road in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii, Friday, May 11, 2018. Kilauea has destroyed more than 35 structures since it began releasing lava from vents about 25 miles (40 kilometers) east of the summit crater. AP
A family gathers at a golf course as an ash plume rises in the distance from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island on May 15, 2018 in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. The U.S. Geological Survey said a recent lowering of the lava lake at the volcano's Halemaumau crater 'has raised the potential for explosive eruptions' at the volcano. AFP
A woman takes a photo as an ash plume rises from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island on May 15, 2018 in Volcano, Hawaii. The U.S. Geological Survey said a recent lowering of the lava lake at the volcano's Halemaumau crater 'has raised the potential for explosive eruptions' at the volcano. AFP
'Ballistic blocks', rocks and ash shot from the Kilauea volcano are seen at the Halema'uma'u parking lot in Hawaii, U.S. May 15, 2018. United States Geological Survey (USGS)/Handout
Flowers are placed on the road as an attribute to the Hawaiian volcano goddess Pele in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii Saturday, May 19, 2018. Two fissures that opened up in a rural Hawaii community have merged to produce faster and more fluid lava. Scientists say the characteristics of lava oozing from fissures in the ground has changed significantly as new magma mixes with decades-old stored lava. AP
This May 19, 2018, Satellite photo provided by DigitalGlobe shows Puna Geothermal Venture, upper left corner, a geothermal energy plant, with lava from Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. The energy plant, shut down after Kilauea first erupted on May 3, provides roughly one-quarter of daily energy demand on the Big Island. (Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company via AP)
Plants grow in cracks on a hardened lava flow from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island on May 15, 2018 in Pahoa, Hawaii. AFP
Steam rises as lava flows into the ocean near Pahoa, Hawaii, Sunday, May 20, 2018. Kilauea volcano that is oozing, spewing and exploding on Hawaii's Big Island has gotten more hazardous in recent days, with rivers of molten rock pouring into the ocean Sunday and flying lava causing the first major injury. AP
A man swims in the ocean in Hilo, Hawaii, Friday, May 11, 2018. Warnings that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could shoot boulders and ash out of its summit crater are prompting people to rethink their plans to visit the Big Island. But most of the rest of the island is free of volcanic hazards, and local tourism officials are hoping travelers will recognize the Big Island is ready to welcome them. AP
This photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows lava fountaining at a fissure near Pahoa on the island of Hawaii Tuesday, June 5, 2018. Lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano destroyed hundreds more homes overnight, overtaking two oceanfront communities where residents were advised to evacuate last week, officials said Tuesday. (U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
Lava flows on the outskirts of Pahoa during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., June 5, 2018. Reuters
Soldiers from the Hawaii National Guard monitor sulfur dioxide gas levels near a lava flow in Leilani Estates during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., June 3, 2018. Reuters
People watch from a tour boat as lava flows into the Pacific Ocean in the Kapoho area, east of Pahoa, during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., June 4, 2018. Reuters




A massive fast moving lava flow consumes everything in its path, as the flames from the remnants of one home burns on the left, while it approaches another on the right. Pahoa, Hawaii, USA, 19 May 2018. The ongoing eruption of Kilauea is the largest in decades, destroying more than 40 homes to date, and displacing thousands. EPA
A resident photographs toxic gases emitting from cracks in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii Saturday, May 19, 2018. Two fissures that opened up in a rural Hawaii community have merged to produce faster and more fluid lava. Scientists say the characteristics of lava oozing from fissures in the ground has changed significantly as new magma mixes with decades-old stored lava. AP
A young resident keeps an eye on lava from a Kilauea volcano fissure erupting and flowing near her home on Hawaii's Big Island on May 19, 2018 in Kapoho, Hawaii. The U.S. Geological Survey said the volcano erupted explosively on May 17 launching a plume about 30,000 feet into the sky. AFP
Lava erupts on the outskirts of Pahoa during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., May 19, 2018. REUTERS
A lava flow is seen on a road in Pahoa, Hawaii, U.S., May 17, 2018 in this picture obtained from social media on May 18, 2018. Kris Burmeister/via Reuters
Wearing a gas mask, U.S. Air National Guardsman Orlando Corpuz uses an SO2 detector to monitor the air quality in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii Friday, May 18, 2018. Hawaii residents covered their faces with masks after a volcano menacing the Big Island for weeks exploded, sending a mixture of pulverized rock, glass and crystal into the air in its strongest eruption of sandlike ash in days. AP
Evacuee Steve Clapper tells his mother, Euteva Bukowiecki, to wear an oxygen tube at a shelter Friday, May 18, 2018, in Pahoa, Hawaii. Hawaii residents covered their faces with masks after a volcano menacing the Big Island for weeks exploded, sending a mixture of pulverized rock, glass and crystal into the air in its strongest eruption of sandlike ash in days. AP
A home is surrounded by massive flows, as lava effuses from a violent fissure eruption on Kilauea's east rift zone, Pahoa, Hawaii, USA, 19 May 2018. The ongoing eruption of Kilauea is the largest in decades, destroying more than 40 homes to date, and displacing thousands. EPA
Center lane lines are partially visible along the lava-covered road in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii, Friday, May 11, 2018. Kilauea has destroyed more than 35 structures since it began releasing lava from vents about 25 miles (40 kilometers) east of the summit crater. AP
A family gathers at a golf course as an ash plume rises in the distance from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island on May 15, 2018 in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. The U.S. Geological Survey said a recent lowering of the lava lake at the volcano's Halemaumau crater 'has raised the potential for explosive eruptions' at the volcano. AFP
A woman takes a photo as an ash plume rises from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island on May 15, 2018 in Volcano, Hawaii. The U.S. Geological Survey said a recent lowering of the lava lake at the volcano's Halemaumau crater 'has raised the potential for explosive eruptions' at the volcano. AFP
'Ballistic blocks', rocks and ash shot from the Kilauea volcano are seen at the Halema'uma'u parking lot in Hawaii, U.S. May 15, 2018. United States Geological Survey (USGS)/Handout
Flowers are placed on the road as an attribute to the Hawaiian volcano goddess Pele in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii Saturday, May 19, 2018. Two fissures that opened up in a rural Hawaii community have merged to produce faster and more fluid lava. Scientists say the characteristics of lava oozing from fissures in the ground has changed significantly as new magma mixes with decades-old stored lava. AP
This May 19, 2018, Satellite photo provided by DigitalGlobe shows Puna Geothermal Venture, upper left corner, a geothermal energy plant, with lava from Kilauea volcano in Pahoa, Hawaii. The energy plant, shut down after Kilauea first erupted on May 3, provides roughly one-quarter of daily energy demand on the Big Island. (Satellite Image ©2018 DigitalGlobe, a Maxar company via AP)
Plants grow in cracks on a hardened lava flow from the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island on May 15, 2018 in Pahoa, Hawaii. AFP
Steam rises as lava flows into the ocean near Pahoa, Hawaii, Sunday, May 20, 2018. Kilauea volcano that is oozing, spewing and exploding on Hawaii's Big Island has gotten more hazardous in recent days, with rivers of molten rock pouring into the ocean Sunday and flying lava causing the first major injury. AP
A man swims in the ocean in Hilo, Hawaii, Friday, May 11, 2018. Warnings that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could shoot boulders and ash out of its summit crater are prompting people to rethink their plans to visit the Big Island. But most of the rest of the island is free of volcanic hazards, and local tourism officials are hoping travelers will recognize the Big Island is ready to welcome them. AP
This photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows lava fountaining at a fissure near Pahoa on the island of Hawaii Tuesday, June 5, 2018. Lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano destroyed hundreds more homes overnight, overtaking two oceanfront communities where residents were advised to evacuate last week, officials said Tuesday. (U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
Lava flows on the outskirts of Pahoa during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., June 5, 2018. Reuters
Soldiers from the Hawaii National Guard monitor sulfur dioxide gas levels near a lava flow in Leilani Estates during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., June 3, 2018. Reuters
People watch from a tour boat as lava flows into the Pacific Ocean in the Kapoho area, east of Pahoa, during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, U.S., June 4, 2018. Reuters




Choi Won-suk wschoi@ktimes.com
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