Trump fans in South Korea hail 'guardian of liberty'

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Trump fans in South Korea hail 'guardian of liberty'



Many conservatives in South Korea that have been embracing Donald Trump's hardline approach to North Korea say they support the U.S. President, even after his change of tune at the Singapore summit. Grace Lee reports.


For 69 year-old Chung Seung Jin in South Korea, the United States is more than just an ally.

He says without America's help in the Korean War, his country wouldn't exist.

That's why he's fiercely loyal to the U.S. and its president, Donald Trump.

69-YEAR-OLD SOUTH KOREAN CONSERVATIVE PROTESTER, CHUNG SEUNG-JIN, SAYING:

"I support Mr. Trump's reign as the leader of the world and guardian of liberty."

Chung is a conservative and a Vietnam war veteran.

He's one of many conservatives that were drawn to Trump's initial tough talk on North Korea.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP:

"Rocket man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime."

But after the U.S. President's June meeting with Kim Jong Un, there's been a shift in tone.

U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SAYING WHILE SEATED AT CONFERENCE TABLE WITH FRENCH PRESIDENT EMMANUEL MACRON AND THEIR DELEGATIONS (WHO REMAIN OFF CAMERA):

"Kim Jong Un, he really has been very open and I think very honorable."

And for some this has been nothing short of a betrayal.

69-YEAR-OLD SOUTH KOREAN CONSERVATIVE PROTESTER, CHUNG SEUNG-JIN, SAYING:

"During the summit, a lot of people were angry. But after gathering some information on social media, we now understand Mr. Trump has a bigger plan behind all of this."

For this colorful group of Trump supporters in Seoul, their faith in the U.S. president is unshaken.

They gather regularly on the streets here to call for aggressive action against the North.

Analysts say anti-communist rhetoric used by the South's military in the 70s still resonate for older conservatives and they see the U.S. as their 'savior'.

Many of them, including Chung, are hoping Trump will resort to a so-called 'regime change' if a denuclearisation deal doesn't pan out.

69-YEAR-OLD SOUTH KOREAN CONSERVATIVE PROTESTER, CHUNG SEUNG-JIN, SAYING:

"North Korea has repeatedly lied. We can't ever trust them and I hope President Trump recognizes that."

A recent poll after the summit pointed to a split in the South, with only 48 percent of conservatives saying the meeting went well compared to almost 80 percent of progressives. (Reuters)



Many conservatives in South Korea that have been embracing Donald Trump's hardline approach to North Korea say they support the U.S. President, even after his change of tune at the Singapore summit. Grace Lee reports.


For 69 year-old Chung Seung Jin in South Korea, the United States is more than just an ally.

He says without America's help in the Korean War, his country wouldn't exist.

That's why he's fiercely loyal to the U.S. and its president, Donald Trump.

69-YEAR-OLD SOUTH KOREAN CONSERVATIVE PROTESTER, CHUNG SEUNG-JIN, SAYING:

"I support Mr. Trump's reign as the leader of the world and guardian of liberty."

Chung is a conservative and a Vietnam war veteran.

He's one of many conservatives that were drawn to Trump's initial tough talk on North Korea.

(SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP:

"Rocket man is on a suicide mission for himself and for his regime."

But after the U.S. President's June meeting with Kim Jong Un, there's been a shift in tone.

U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP SAYING WHILE SEATED AT CONFERENCE TABLE WITH FRENCH PRESIDENT EMMANUEL MACRON AND THEIR DELEGATIONS (WHO REMAIN OFF CAMERA):

"Kim Jong Un, he really has been very open and I think very honorable."

And for some this has been nothing short of a betrayal.

69-YEAR-OLD SOUTH KOREAN CONSERVATIVE PROTESTER, CHUNG SEUNG-JIN, SAYING:

"During the summit, a lot of people were angry. But after gathering some information on social media, we now understand Mr. Trump has a bigger plan behind all of this."

For this colorful group of Trump supporters in Seoul, their faith in the U.S. president is unshaken.

They gather regularly on the streets here to call for aggressive action against the North.

Analysts say anti-communist rhetoric used by the South's military in the 70s still resonate for older conservatives and they see the U.S. as their 'savior'.

Many of them, including Chung, are hoping Trump will resort to a so-called 'regime change' if a denuclearisation deal doesn't pan out.

69-YEAR-OLD SOUTH KOREAN CONSERVATIVE PROTESTER, CHUNG SEUNG-JIN, SAYING:

"North Korea has repeatedly lied. We can't ever trust them and I hope President Trump recognizes that."

A recent poll after the summit pointed to a split in the South, with only 48 percent of conservatives saying the meeting went well compared to almost 80 percent of progressives. (Reuters)

Choi Won-suk wschoi@ktimes.com
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