All you need to know about the Boeing 737 Max 8

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All you need to know about the Boeing 737 Max 8




The United States has told airlines the Boeing 737 Max 8 is safe to fly as investigators found two black box recorders from Sunday's downed Ethiopian Airlines jet, according to Reuters.


According to Reuters, China and Indonesia have both grounded their 737 Max 8 fleets on Monday, citing safety concerns.

Investigators in Ethiopia found two black box recorders early on Monday that will help authorities figure out what brought the plane down in a crash that killed 157 people. The accident comes months after the same model jet crashed in Indonesia killing 189 people.

According to Boeing, the 737 Max 8 is a single-aisle plane that has a quieter cabin, more legroom for passengers and was designed to be more fuel efficient.

The plane measures 39.52 meters long, with a wingspan of 35.9 meters. It is equipped

with LEAP-1B engines and has a range of 6,550 kilometers.

According to the New York Times, the 200-seat Boeing 737 Max 8 has been a popular plane after being introduced in 2017, with more than 4,000 planes ordered in the first six months. (Next Animation via Reuters)

In this file photo taken on March 16, 2018 a Boeing 737 MAX 7 taxis at Boeing Field, in Seattle, Washington. - Tumbling shares in US aviation giant Boeing on March 11, 2019 tore a hole in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, sending the benchmark index into the red for a sixth day. About five minutes into the day's trading, Boeing shares were down 11.7 percent at $373.23 following the most recent crash of one of its aircraft in Ethiopia.The Dow fell 179 points to 25,294.19, but the broader S&P 500 rose 0.3 percent to 2,756.14 7.21 and the tech-heavy Nasdaq was up an even stronger 0.6 percent at 7,464.31. AFP


Wreckage lies at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 en route to Nairobi, Kenya, near Bishoftu, Ethiopia, 10 March 2019. All passengers onboard the scheduled flight ET 302 carrying 149 passengers and 8 crew members, have died, the airlines says. EPA



The United States has told airlines the Boeing 737 Max 8 is safe to fly as investigators found two black box recorders from Sunday's downed Ethiopian Airlines jet, according to Reuters.


According to Reuters, China and Indonesia have both grounded their 737 Max 8 fleets on Monday, citing safety concerns.

Investigators in Ethiopia found two black box recorders early on Monday that will help authorities figure out what brought the plane down in a crash that killed 157 people. The accident comes months after the same model jet crashed in Indonesia killing 189 people.

According to Boeing, the 737 Max 8 is a single-aisle plane that has a quieter cabin, more legroom for passengers and was designed to be more fuel efficient.

The plane measures 39.52 meters long, with a wingspan of 35.9 meters. It is equipped

with LEAP-1B engines and has a range of 6,550 kilometers.

According to the New York Times, the 200-seat Boeing 737 Max 8 has been a popular plane after being introduced in 2017, with more than 4,000 planes ordered in the first six months. (Next Animation via Reuters)

In this file photo taken on March 16, 2018 a Boeing 737 MAX 7 taxis at Boeing Field, in Seattle, Washington. - Tumbling shares in US aviation giant Boeing on March 11, 2019 tore a hole in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, sending the benchmark index into the red for a sixth day. About five minutes into the day's trading, Boeing shares were down 11.7 percent at $373.23 following the most recent crash of one of its aircraft in Ethiopia.The Dow fell 179 points to 25,294.19, but the broader S&P 500 rose 0.3 percent to 2,756.14 7.21 and the tech-heavy Nasdaq was up an even stronger 0.6 percent at 7,464.31. AFP


Wreckage lies at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 en route to Nairobi, Kenya, near Bishoftu, Ethiopia, 10 March 2019. All passengers onboard the scheduled flight ET 302 carrying 149 passengers and 8 crew members, have died, the airlines says. EPA
Choi Won-suk wschoi@koreatimes.co.kr


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