Woori, KB support Afghan evacuees in Korea - Korea Times
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Woori, KB support Afghan evacuees in Korea

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A placard welcoming Afghan evacuees hangs at the entrance to the Leadership Campus of the National Human Resources Development Institute in Jincheon, North Chungcheong Province, in this August file photo. Yonhap
A placard welcoming Afghan evacuees hangs at the entrance to the Leadership Campus of the National Human Resources Development Institute in Jincheon, North Chungcheong Province, in this August file photo. Yonhap

By Park Jae-hyuk

Domestic commercial banks have begun to provide the 390 Afghan evacuees in Korea with a wide range of support, so that they can adapt to the unfamiliar environment by having better access to banking, education, mobile communication and medical services.

Woori Bank said that it will set up a movable branch until Friday at the National Human Resources Development Institute in Jincheon, North Chungcheong Province, which has been used as a temporary shelter for the evacuees.

The branch will enable them to open bank accounts, use online banking and designate the banks they will use to exchange foreign currency.

The bank will also teach them about Korea's financial system.

Among the evacuees, 230 minors will receive textbooks and stationery needed for learning how to read hangeul.

"Through this project, we will help the Afghan evacuees adapt to Korean society earlier," a Woori Bank official said.

KB Kookmin Bank has joined hands with the Korean Red Cross to cover the medical expenses of the evacuees, so that they can continue to live stable lives, even after they move out of the temporary shelter.

The bank also plans to provide them with USIM cards for its budget phone service, Liiv M, and to cover their mobile phone bills.

In addition, it will help the Afghan minors learn how to read hangeul and math, using tablet computers.

"We made this decision to help the Afghan evacuees to regain their mental health and adapt to the new environment earlier," a KB Kookmin Bank official said.

The Afghan evacuees arrived in Korea with their families in August, based on their contributions to the Korean government's activities there.

The government has decided to allow them to live and work here for at least five years.


Park Jae-hyuk pjh@koreatimes.co.kr


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